Skip to main content
Category

News

For news on MVJ – new programs, grants, platform updates, and other related items.

Army National Guard Officer and Freelancer Gets Published Thanks to MVJ Mentorship Program

By News

Pictured are Army National Guard Officer Davis Winkie, a mentee in the MVJ mentorship program and his mentor, an award-winning journalist named Erin Siegal McIntyre.

NEW JERSEY- Military Veterans in Journalism highlights the benefits from its mentorship program with a recent testimonial from Award-Winning Journalist Erin Siegal McIntyre and Army National Guard Officer Davis Winkie.

Mentorship plays a key role in shaping professional and personal development in both the military and civilian sector. One of the main resources offered by Military Veterans in Journalism is its mentorship program, where a newly-transitioned veteran is paired up with an experienced media professional. Mentors and mentees have the opportunity to learn from one another within the program.

Director of Digital Strategy and Content Babee Garcia understands the value and importance of having a mentor in journalism.

“Networking is crucial in journalism,” said Babee Garcia. “This mentorship program helps build confidence and credibility for our mentees. Few of them earn success on their own, and need someone with insight to advance them in their careers. From personal experience, I am lucky to have great mentors, to include college professors and MVJ President Russell Midori.”

Davis Winkie, a Human Resources Officer (42B) in the Army National Guard, has many accomplishments under his belt, including a tour as an Administrative Officer for an engineering task force that planned field hospitals in North Carolina during COVID-19. Prior to his military service, he was a historian with a desire to research and write. He noticed the similarities between historians and journalists as both work to find the truth within storytelling. Determined to combine his skills and experiences, Winkie found his purpose —reporting with immediacy and a sense of urgency.

Since being a part of Military Veterans in Journalism’s mentorship program, Winkie has had a byline in The New Republic, Task & Purpose, VICE, and other national news publications. Winkie encourages veterans, who are pursuing a career in journalism, to take advantage of the tools and opportunities offered at MVJ.

“Programs like MVJ’s mentorship are extremely important to folks like me without traditional journalism backgrounds who have potential, but just need a little guidance,” said Davis Winkie.

He is currently still training in the U.S. Army National Guard while working as a freelancer and a contract job with the Digital Library of Georgia. He is building a digital exhibit about the history of racial violence in his hometown of Forsyth County, GA.

Erin Siegal McIntyre is an accomplished investigative journalist and author. In 2012, Beacon Press published her award-winning book “Finding Fernanda”- the basis for an hour-long CBS special investigation that was awarded a 2015 News Emmy. Throughout most of her career, she has been a freelancer, who published stories in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Latino USA, and various other media outlets.

For McIntyre, this has been her first time providing guidance for her mentee. She speaks highly about Winkie’s work ethic and how the experience has been both instructive and inspiring.

“I’ve been impressed with his high level of organization, his excellent and prompt communication, his wit and humor, and his ability to consider immediate and long-term career options simultaneously—not to mention drafting and publishing pieces while on duty,” said Erin Siegal McIntyre. “Who wouldn’t be impressed? Vets have a skillset that lends itself well to both collecting and organizing information, which is basically the core of what journalists do. He’s also ambitious, which is a quality any journalist needs in today’s market. When I was starting out, many of my opportunities arose from the kindness of others. It’s really satisfying for me now to be able to open doors and help the next generation.”

McIntyre recalls a long phone conversation with Winkie, where they shared insight on professional networking, strategic planning, resumes, cover letters, planning a career trajectory, and other important building blocks to sustain a successful journey into journalism. They spoke about one of Winkie’s stories, brainstorming how to approach certain sources, and how to acquire certain kinds of information.

“I was so surprised to hear how fluent he is in public records requests; that’s a quality of utmost importance and he’s already very experienced,” said Erin Siegal McIntyre.

In some instances, McIntyre became the student, as Winkie taught her about his area of expertise.

“Davis was recently a PhD student in history at UNC-Chapel Hill, immersed in academic writing, research, and classroom instruction, and so our conversation ended with the tables being flipped: he gave me some advice on university culture and provided an insider’s on-the-ground perspective on the institution’s more recent history related to Confederate monuments on campus,” said Erin Siegal McIntyre.

She also spoke positively about giving back through mentorship and how it helps other journalists, saying “It’s nearly impossible to get anywhere in journalism without a robust network and a few people guiding you, at least a little. Even informal mentorship can be of outsize value; my fellow journalists are almost entirely accessible, generous, and kind…Those of us already working in the field consider it a privilege to help and pass along what we’ve learned.”

Potential volunteers can sign-up on MVJ’s website to participate in the mentorship program.

###

 

2020 NPR Internship is On Again, and fully remote!

By News, Resources

Military Veterans in Journalism (MVJ) is excited to announce that the internship program with National Public Radio (NPR) is on again! It’s specifically for military veterans, and it’s paid.

The best part? It’s completely remote.

The deadline to apply is Friday July 10 at 6 pm EST through MVJ at this link.

An internship is a great way to get your start in journalism. It allows for networking and getting hands-on experience, positioning you for a full time role. NPR Interns will gain exposure to training, NPR’s daily operations, and work alongside world-class journalism professionals. Thank you NPR for your role in supporting military veterans seeking to get started in the journalism world!

The program runs from September 8, 2020 to December 11, 2020. We’re really excited to offer this opportunity to MVJ members and hope that it will be the first of many internship/fellowship partnerships to come! Once again, the link to apply is here.

A Memorial Day Reflection During COVID-19

By News

5/23/20 WASHINGTON DC: Riders with Flags of Honor arrived in Washington, D.C., to pay their respects to those who have give the ultimate sacrifice this year on Memorial Day weekend. Photo Credit: Andrew M. Byers

By Guest Contributor Jeff Walsh

Edited by MVJ Blog Editor Erich Reimer and Director of Digital Strategy and Content Babee Garcia

In October 1990, I took the oath of enlistment and honorably served in the military for 15 years. It has been another 15 years since my transition into the civilian sector again, but my pride as a veteran remains strong. Each Memorial Day, I reflect on my brothers and sisters in arms, who have inspired so many and paved the way for so many soldiers like myself. However, this year’s Memorial Day brings many obstacles in how to properly honor those who died and grieve.

COVID-19 has impacted us all, and made us adapt during these unprecedented times. On this Memorial Day weekend, we are not all enjoying a large backyard BBQ. There are no restaurants to sit in and social distancing is encouraged in every direction. Many parades and ceremonies are cancelled or moved virtually this year. Although we cannot celebrate this occasion under normal circumstances, we must pause to honor the brave men and women soldiers, sailors, Coast Guard, Airmen, Marines and National Guardsmen who lost their lives in service to the red, white and blue. We must reflect about the servicemen and servicewomen lost during World War II, the Vietnam War, the Korean War, Desert Storm, Afghanistan, during and post 9/11, conflicts from Panama to Grenada, and other deployments.

At the same token, we should also pause for a moment of silence to honor those Americans, our fallen band of brothers and sisters, who left us much too soon due the silent and deadly coronavirus. Many of the newly departed will not have a proper burial or funeral for many months to come. We should also take a moment to thank the new modern-day heroes of this new global war that is being fought day and night in hospital wards and emergency rooms.

Some veterans continue serving others in different careers fields during COVID-19, including the medical profession. I was grateful enough to have worked within a medical-related MOS in the U.S. Army. From personal experience, some of my fondest memories were from the Medical Corps with two different MOS’ and two distinct medical jobs. First, I served as a 91B Army medic with the 2nd I.D.“Second to None” at Camp Casey, South Korea and then with 1st Armored Division “Old Iron sides” at Fort Riley, Kansas including a deployment to Kuwait. I also served as a 91Q Pharmacy Technician at Reynolds Army Community Hospital at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

This photo was taken in 1999 at Camp Casey in South Korea just 10 miles from the DMZ. Pictured are Jeffrey Walsh and his Army medical platoon of 1/503 Infantry Battalion.

As someone with a medical and military background, I empathize with the hardships that our frontline workers may be experiencing. Some of them will contract COVID-19 and risk the possibility of bringing it into their homes. Others will develop symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and/or depression. Some of them go above and beyond to communicate with loved ones via Skype or Facetime when in-person visits are restricted. These courageous men and women are going through similar challenges that military service members experienced. I admire their bravery and acknowledge them as well not only on occasion, but each and every day.

According to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University and U.S. National Archives, there are over 5 million confirmed cases and there are at least 100,000 lives lost in the United States— more lives than the Korean War and more lives than the Vietnam War. As we have discovered on our mighty fleet of aircraft carriers and at our nation’s VA centers and veteran’s homes, the virus does not discriminate between military personnel, veterans or civilians. Let us also pause for a moment on this Memorial Day to also reflect on the veterans, who have lost their lives. Twenty years from now, some will tell their grandchildren that they were “Veterans of the COVID-19 Worldwide Pandemic.”

Let’s acknowledge the frontline workers, who are substituting kevlars, fatigues and combat boots with PPE. This new war is being fought day and night by a vast army in scrubs, masks and surgical gowns.

5/23/20 WASHINGTON DC: Riders with Flags of Honor arrived in Washington, D.C., to pay their respects to those who have give the ultimate sacrifice this year on Memorial Day weekend. Photo credit: Andrew M. Byers

EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece reflects the opinion of one of our newest Jeff Walsh, who served in the U.S. Army and Army National Guard from 1990-2005. He was on guard duty at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics and was stationed in South Korea near the DMZ.

Spring 2021 MVJ Video Journalism Workshop at Ole Miss

By News

We are very excited to announce that Military Veterans in Journalism will host eight (8) online sessions for a video journalism workshop for 10 military veterans in the early stages of their journalism careers in spring of 2021. The Walton Family Foundation sponsored this workshop.

Applications for this event are closed. However, we encourage you to check out our website for upcoming events and resources. COVID-19’s future impact on bringing people together in the coming months (and years) is still unknown. For now, we are moving forward with planning for these dates, but the timing may have to shift.

 In partnership with the University of Mississippi’s School of Journalism and New Media and with the support from FUJIFILM, this is a unique opportunity to learn from one of the most renowned professors in the field. Duy Linh Tu, Associate Professor of Professional Practice at Columbia University, will be the lead instructor. He’s a journalist and a documentary filmmaker, focusing on education, science, and social justice.

This course will teach you how to tell stories through video, focusing on the essentials:

• conceiving and structuring a story

• how to handle a camera

• using post-production software

• combining audio and visual components to deliver a story

Prior experience working in video and journalism, defined broadly, is preferable but not necessary. In addition to the video training, we will have several guest speakers throughout the week. As you know, video is a valuable skill for new journalists to bring to the table as they seek employment. This workshop will set you up for success and give you an edge up on the competition.

Apply Now For The (Paid!) 2020 NPR Internship for Military Veterans in Journalism!

By News, Resources

Update: This internship opportunity is on hold as a result of COVID-19. We will provide updates as soon as we have more details on rescheduling this chance to work for NPR.

Military Veterans in Journalism (MVJ) is excited to announce that we’ve partnered with National Public Radio (NPR) to offer a paid internship in Summer 2020 specifically for military veterans! It’s paid, will be in either Washington DC, Los Angeles, or New York City, and the deadline to apply is March 6 at 6 pm EST through MVJ at this link.

An internship is a great way to get your start in journalism. It allows for networking and getting hands-on experience, positioning you for a full time role. NPR Interns will gain exposure to training, NPR’s daily operations, and work alongside world-class journalism professionals. Thank you NPR for your role in supporting military veterans seeking to get started in the journalism world!

The program runs from June 1, 2020 to August 21, 2020. We are really excited to offer this opportunity to MVJ members and hope that it will be the first of many internship/fellowship partnerships to come! Once again, the link to apply is here.

The team from Montclair State University accepted a student Edward R. Murrow award for "Montclair News Lab: Hurricane Recovery in Puerto Rico." Photo credit: David Nicholas Photography

Celebrating Excellence in Journalism

By News

For the past 48 years, the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) has recognized important contributions in broadcast and digital journalism. Amongst this year’s student Edward R. Murrow award recipients were my team and I for “Montclair News Lab: Hurricane Recovery In Puerto Rico” in the Excellence in Video Reporting category.

In March 2018, I joined a team of student and faculty journalists to document aid and recovery efforts after Hurricane Maria struck the island. Within a week’s time, our team explored areas that were impacted including education, tourism, businesses, destruction of homes, food distribution, and agriculture. We also formed friendships, overcame challenges, and created memories that will last a lifetime along the way- all while understanding the purpose and power behind journalism.

To have earned a Murrow award in the same room full of talented journalists, who have worked in the industry for years from various news organizations, was truly an honor. As I reunited with peers and faculty from my alma matter, I embraced this moment of recognition. I reflected on how valuable this trip was for our professional growth and development as the next generation of storytellers.

10/14/2019 NEW YORK, NY: The team from Montclair News Lab: Hurricane Recovery in Puerto Rico spoke to CBS National Lead Correspondent David Begnaud at the 2019 Edward R. Murrow Awards Gala. Photo Credit: Laura Galarza

MVJ Social Media Coordinator and Marine Corps veteran Babee Garcia poses with her team’s Edward R. Murrow award at Gotham Hall for their team project “Montclair News Lab: Hurricane Recovery in Puerto Rico.” Photo credit: Alfredo Garcia Rodriguez

It was a great opportunity to not only celebrate our achievements, but to network amongst other media professionals. CBS National Lead Correspondent David Begnaud took some time to congratulate my team. He also gave us great advice on continuing to spread awareness with our storytelling efforts, “Make sure you are promoting it [your work] as much as you can cause that’s how we serve a purpose.”

As a fan of David’s reporting in Puerto Rico, it was personally one of the best highlights of the night. It seemed as if our encounter had come full-circle since we had all told important stories from the island. As we walked on to accept our award, I acknowledged David was clapping and cheering for us backstage. Later that evening, we had also met Senator Bill Bradley, CBS News President Susan Zirinsky, and many others.

I felt proud that our work has been highly recognized by the Television Academy Foundation in California and RTDNA this year. However, our greatest reward throughout our journey had been having our stories being visible, shared and heard.

Our expectations in Puerto Rico were simple- to share stories with the intent to understand and capture the destruction of Hurricane Maria. It took a village, including the extraordinary leadership of our professors, to shape us into the skilled journalists we are today.

This entire experience has made me appreciate the value of journalism across all levels. Whether it is contributing to college journalism or a news organization with a large market, our voices matter. We, as journalists, work hard to highlight injustice and people serving their communities in hopes of getting others to listen.

If we are exercising the ethics, putting in the time, and sharing content, then we are all winners. With and without the awards, we continue to make a difference in bringing local and national attention on stories that need an active voice.

I am humbled by all of the amazing people I met and who have encouraged me thus far. After transitioning from the Marine Corps in 2016, I received the best college education from Montclair State University. Working with the students and faculty convinced me to seize every opportunity I could to be a versatile journalist, including traveling to Puerto Rico. I would like to thank everyone there, who helped foster my creativity and fuel my passion in journalism.

I would also like to thank Military Veterans in Journalism, a non-profit organization that serves others through impactful storytelling, for their continuous support. I am grateful to be a part of their team as Social Media Coordinator.

10/14/2019 NEW YORK, NY: From left to Right: Mariano Arocho, Krystal Acosta, Genesis Obando, Madj Traore, Laura Galarza, Babee Garcia, David Sanders, Kathleen Reddington, and Steve McCarthy at the 2019 Edward R. Murrow Awards Gala in Gotham Hall. (Not pictured: Thomas E. Franklin, Natalie De La Rosa, and Madison Glassman) Photo credit: Alfredo Garcia Rodriguez

Military Veterans in Journalism MVJ logo transparent

Join us: We are looking for interns

By News

Want to start on the ground level and work with an organization that is growing fast? Become an intern with Military Veterans in Journalism.

Military Veterans in Journalism is a professional association that builds community for vets, supports their career growth, and advocates for diversifying newsrooms through hiring and promoting more vets.  

We launched on May 2 this year, and we are looking for an intern to support our membership and outreach efforts. Depending on how that goes, we’ll ask for you support in creating partnerships with journalism universities and veteran student groups.

We are looking for people with creativity who have ideas of how to improve the organization. Since we’re new, you’ll have the chance to make a big impact in our community.

We will train you on membership outreach and partnership creation.

We’d like someone to volunteer 10 hours per week but more time would be great, too.

Join our team and work with us as we move forward in our mission. Email us your résumé with a quick note about why you are interested. Let us know if you have any questions.

Military Veterans in Journalism officially launches

By News

We’re proud to announce the official launch of Military Veterans in Journalism!

Military Veterans in Journalism is a professional association that creates community for vets, supports their career growth, and advocates for increasing newsroom diversity through hiring more vets.

While there is limited data available on how many military veterans now work as journalists, it’s clear they are underrepresented. Whether they worked as a culinary specialist, an EOD tech, or a public affairs officer, we believe veterans bring a diversity of thought and experience that should be more significantly leveraged by media outlets.

We will address this by talking to leaders in newsrooms and their human resources departments about the value that vets bring to the news industry as a result of their military service.

Further, we know veterans have a tough time breaking into journalism as a career. To address this, our all-volunteer staff will run a mentorship program to support veterans as they progress professionally in the media industry. We will also create community (mostly online but also through in person events) that will give vets a chance to network and support each other.

We invite you to browse around our website to learn more about our programming.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED:

  • If you’re a veteran working in journalism or aspiring to work in journalism, we invite you to become a member.
  • If you’re a journalist (veteran or not) interested in mentoring veterans, we invite you to become a mentor.
  • If you have any ideas, thoughts or want to get involved, feel free to get in touch: [email protected] . We’d love to hear from you.

While we are just getting started, we look forward to supporting our fellow veterans in media.

We will be holding an informally launch celebration with supporters at Alligator Lounge in Brooklyn, New York, at 6:30 p.m. The event is open to the public.

Thanks in advance for your support!

Russell Midori (MVJ’s President) & Zack Baddorf (MVJ’s Executive Director)