Skip to main content
Category

Resources

Nonprofit newsrooms put focus on mission, impact

By #MVJ2021, Resources

by Genaro J. Prieto

The Nonprofit News Panel on Day 2 of the Military Veterans in Journalism convention presented a discussion on why nonprofit news matters for communities and the nation as a whole. 

Sarah Shahriari, the Director of Leadership and Talent Development at Institute for Nonprofit News, opened the discussion by describing innovation and community engagement tools employed by the 350 non-profit and non-partisan news organizations INN supports. 

“INN members are really working to convey the truth, to build community ties, and to inform people in their communities so they can make decisions about their own lives and about their civic life,” Shahriari said. 

Xanthe Scharff, the CEO and Cofounder of The Fuller Project – a global newsroom centered on women, said the mission-focused nature of nonprofit news sets it apart in the types of journalists it attracts and the way outcomes are measured. 

“When I got into non-profit space I already had a bias for this sort of work…this mission work,” said Sherman Gillums, who sits on the board of the veteran-focused non-profit newsroom, “The War Horse.” Gillums said he was driven by the work of “Speaking truth to power…and making the public a part of it.”

The panel unanimously echoed the importance of truth and accountability, and the need to give a voice to those who typically are overlooked. Nonprofit news is especially valuable for its ability to impact issues through telling the story and capturing the moment.

The War Horse Managing Editor Kelly Kennedy said her reporting and leadership has been intended to bring light to the needs and perspectives of soldiers on the ground. “When things were going down in Kabul we thought about how it felt for the veterans to be processing it right now, and we ran a series of reflections every day that week from people just talking about how it felt. And it was a way to process the story and to deal with the trauma of it.” 

Sherman said, “We are going to keep doing this.  We are going to keep pressing truth as a friend to the public.”

Kelly offered insights for attendees about building their portfolio of clips, taking initiative, and suggested veterans can use the Warhorse reflections series as a starting point. She said, “You can’t wait for someone to make you an investigative reporter. You can’t do that. You have to become the investigative reporter.”

One audience member asked “would you say it is easier to enter nonprofit journalism as opposed to traditional journalism?” 

Regardless of a journalist’s military experience, whether reporting in combat or down the street, the nonprofit sector of journalism has its unique qualities. But ultimately the passion for telling the story truthfully and accurately is essential, and the work gives reporters the power to influence positive change and give voice to groups without wide representation.

The highest value of nonprofit news seems to be it’s power to tell the stories of those that might otherwise be forgotten. 

CUNY’s Jeff Jarvis shares insights into the new models of journalism

By #MVJ2021, Resources

by Kayleigh Casto

Military Veterans in Journalism continued its virtual convention Friday with a second day of panelists. Sharing insights into the new models of journalism was Jeff Jarvis, a CUNY Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism professor.

“Journalism is not a product, it’s a service,” he said. “We don’t just create a product called content to sell in a thing we call a publication. We have so many more tools at hand to listen to communities that have too long not been listened to, like veterans.”

Jarvis explained how communities became overlooked in journalism through the invention of high-speed printing presses during the era of Johanne Gutenburg, which created the idea of “mass media, mass marketing and mass culture.”

“The mass as an idea is fundamentally an insult to the public, because it says that everybody is all the same,” he said.

According to Jarvis, reporters have a unique opportunity to reinvent the field of journalism by understanding the needs of these underserved communities.

“Who are you serving? Who is it that needs your service of journalism? What do they need? Show the evidence of their definition of community. Show the evidence of their need as a community,” he said.

Reporters can help to foster the needs of these communities by introducing new perspectives in the newsroom, educating the community or facilitating informed public conversations. All of which promote what Jarvis called “a large canvas” for the future of journalism.

The session itself became a public conversation, with audience members offering ideas about models of journalism, and questioning Jeff directly.

Dan Lyons, a photo editor at Chalkbeat asked Jarvis about how local news models should engage with communities who are underserved or unserved by any news outlet

Jarvis pointed to the Institute for Nonprofit News and Chalkbeat as examples of where innovation can occur for legacy media organizations to follow. One example of such innovation, he noted, is Chalkbeat’s development of tools that compel reporters to decide beforehand why a story should be done, and afterward to measure the impact.

Jarvis elaborated on the future of journalism in revenue opportunities saying, “We have to reinvent the fundamental metrics of success in journalism and in media around quality and value.”

He described the use of membership models as a valuable way to fund reporting. Membership recognizes the reader as a community member while sharing their needs, interests and circumstances, furthering the affinity between communities and journalism, he said. But it was clear from the exchanges he sees many more viable models for funding strong reporting.

He spoke, for instance, about the work of organizations like Buzzfeed and Vice to sell skills rather than eyeballs on a story – as in, the skill of creating advertising their audiences actually care about. Those publishers take creative control over their advertising to do so, using the profits to fund their reporting.

Whether such skills can be applied in a revenue model by local news publishers, he’s still working on. “It could be that we establish a reputation for knowing how to serve people and listen to them well,” he said. “We’ve got to figure out how to do it or else, there’s not enough money in philanthropy…subscriptions…or the government to fund all the journalism we need.”

Several attendees wanted to know whether he was hopeful about the future of the industry.

“Yeah,” Jarvis said, matter-of-factly. “If I weren’t I’d be a fraud teaching journalism school…and the reason I’m hopeful is my students.” Jarvis teaches engagement at the CUNY J-School and says graduates of the program are in high demand because of the skills they bring to the newsroom. They understand “how to listen to the public and create a feedback loop that is more than data and clicks, but that is substantive and valuable.”

#MVJ2021’s veteran showcase shares career-changing advice

By #MVJ2021, Resources

By Maximillian Boudreaux

Seasoned journalists provided career advice for the next generation of military storytellers during the first night of Military Veterans in Journalism’s inaugural convention on Oct. 21.

The Veteran Showcase panel was led by Justine Davie, a Marine veteran who produces the Ten Percent Happier podcast focusing on people becoming more fulfilled with their life.

The panel featured a diverse group of veterans with a wide range of skills in journalism. One of the mentors on the panel was J.P. Lawrence, a U.S. Army National Guard veteran who served from 2008 until 2017. Lawrence works for Stars and Stripes as a Middle East Reporter.

An important piece of advice Lawrence gave to other journalists: “Try to use networks that can get you around the networks.”

Clara Navarro also served on this panel of advisors. She served for two years in the Navy as a public affairs officer. During the panel she talked about her upcoming transition out of the military in January 2022. She will be starting an internship with National Public Radio.

“It’s not just your resume but it’s your clips, and there is nothing holding you back from writing to just write,” Navarro shared with the veterans in attendance who are seeking advice for how to break into the industry

Another journalism guru who helped round out this cast of storytellers was Davis Winkie, a North Carolina Army National Guard Veteran who works as reporter for the Army Times. He said his mission is to keep the military accountable.

During the panel, Winkie talked about how the Military Veterans in Journalism played a pivotal role in him landing his first job. He also shared how, at the beginning of his career, he was shocked to be getting some of the interviews he received. Winkie shared with the group that at times he would canvass people on LinkedIn for advice.

“My advice is to lean into as many groups as you can. Leaning into those groups really helped me learn the ropes,” Winkie said.

CNN sponsors Military Veterans in Journalism’s inaugural convention, brings on vets as fellows in newsroom

By #MVJ2021, Resources

Jake Tapper of CNN’s “The Lead” and “State of the Union” also joins MVJ Advisory Board

 

New York (July 21, 2021) — CNN will be the key sponsor for the inaugural Military Veterans in Journalism convention, slated for October 21 and 22. CNN will also host two veterans as fellows in their newsrooms this fall. 

“CNN has demonstrated time and again its commitment to diversifying America’s newsrooms,” said Zack Baddorf, a Navy vet turned journalist who is MVJ’s founder and executive director. “Military Veterans in Journalism believes America’s newsrooms should reflect the diversity of our nation — which includes military veterans. We are very proud to be working with CNN to further this cause.”

In addition to sponsoring the convention, CNN will be hosting two MVJ Fellows in its Washington, D.C. bureau this fall as part of its News Associates program. The CNN News Associates program is a year-long program which rotates aspiring CNN journalists throughout the CNN Washington newsroom and prepares participants with skill sets needed for the next level. During their rotations, one fellow will be assigned to “The Lead with Jake Tapper” and one fellow will be assigned to “New Day” where co-host Brianna Keilar, a military spouse, has been committed to covering stories about military families. 

“Representation matters at CNN,” said Jeff Zucker, President of CNN Worldwide and Chairman, WarnerMedia News & Sports. “Diverse voices throughout our global organization enable us to be authentic and richer storytellers. We are incredibly proud of our partnership with Military Veterans in Journalism, and I personally look forward to further heightening veteran voices across all of CNN’s platforms.”

Anchor Jake Tapper joined the MVJ Advisory Board this month.  

A long-time supporter of veterans, Tapper was awarded the “Tex” McCrary Award for Excellence in Journalism in 2014 for his book “The Outpost: An Untold Story of American Valor.” The book recounted one of the most harrowing stories of heroism out of the war in Afghanistan. It is now a Netflix feature film.

“I am honored to support the mission of Military Veterans in Journalism,” Tapper said. “Our nation’s veterans bring unique skills and life experiences to newsrooms. It’s important that veteran voices continue to be a part of our national conversation on military and veteran affairs.”

Barbara Starr, CNN’s Pentagon correspondent, served as a founding Board member of MVJ. She now serves on the Advisory Board.

MVJ’s inaugural convention from October 21-22 will be a virtual gathering for journalists, non-profit professionals, newsroom leaders, and other supporters of newsroom diversity to share, learn and connect with each other while focusing on supporting the under-represented community of military veterans in journalism.

About Military Veterans in Journalism

Military Veterans in Journalism is a professional association that builds community for vets, supports their career growth, and advocates for diversifying newsrooms through hiring and promoting more vets. Learn more at www.mvj.network 

About CNN

CNN/U.S., the leading 24-hour news and information cable television network and the flagship of all CNN news brands, invented 24-hour television news. CNN/U.S. provides live coverage and analysis of breaking news, as well as a full range of international, political, business, entertainment, sports, health, science and weather coverage, and topical in-depth interviews.

Military Vets: Apply for Paid Journalism Fellowships!

By Career Opportunities, News

MVJ is excited to announce that we will be hosting seven paid fellowships lasting about six months each at the news room of your choice!

Four of the fellowships are funded thanks to generous support from the Knight Foundation, two of the fellowships are possible thanks to the generous support of Craig Newmark Philanthropies and the one fellowship is thanks to the generous support of the Wyncote Foundation.

Learn more and Apply

Deadline: June 11, 2021

 

Military Vets: Apply for Free Online Poynter Institute Journalism Classes

By News, Resources

Since our founding in 2019, MVJ has done some awesome things for veterans in journalism. From a virtual career fair with the biggest names in media, to landing fellowship spots at NPR for our members, we are committed to delivering tangible results for our membership.

Our latest accomplishment: MVJ has secured more than $20,000 in Poynter Institute online courses for our members to take for free.

Made possible thanks to the generous support of the Craig Newmark Philanthropies, these courses will directly help our membership gain actionable skills that they can put to work immediately.

Poynter Institute has a treasure trove of training opportunities for journalists of every type. From courses focusing on how to become a better writer to courses on film and broadcast television, Poynter has it all

What this means for you:
You’ll have free access to some of Poynter’s popular courses. If you find these courses useful, we’ll find other ways to work with Poynter for even more training.

Here is the list:
Newsroom Readiness Certificate: Get ready for your first newsroom job by covering the basics of newsgathering, interviewing, media law, ethics and diversity

A Reporters’ Guide to Getting it Right: Learn how to secure accuracy and fairness in your reporting, well-before your deadline

MediaWise Fact-checking 101: Learn from tools and techniques you can use to fact-check information online and sort fact from fiction across social media platforms

TV News Toolbox for Educators: Bring duPont, Peabody and national Emmy award-winners from local and network news into your classroom with this collection of 38 microlearning activities

The Art of the Interview: How to find and court your story’s characters

Survive and Thrive in Freelance and Remote Work: Improve your effectiveness in your freelance solo act, side hustle or remote work environment

So how to start? Go here to create a free user account if you don’t already have one, and add up to three of these courses to your shopping cart.

Go HERE for the coupon code to access courses. If you’re not a member yet, please sign up.

Members can also apply through MVJ for a scholarship to some of Poynter’s limited-enrollment courses in 2021.

Those course are:

Poynter Aces Certificate in Editing: Six courses with six assessments: ideal for journalists looking to strengthen their understanding of the standards, essential skills and best practices of editing (normally $150)

Poynter ACES Advanced Editing Certificate: Two intensive training opportunities for experienced editors: a four-week online course that includes live online sessions, coaching, homework and discussion forums; and self-directed components include videos, readings, activities and assessments (normally $600)

Write Your Heart Out 2022: Uncover the powerful stories from your life and learn how to share them in ways that resonate with audiences during this four-week online course (normally $349)

Producer Project 2022: An eight-session, four-week online seminar that helps TV producers tell stronger stories and make tough calls on deadline (normally $499)

Apply for a scholarship to one of the above premium courses HERE

Lastly,

As part of our partnership with Poynter, Al Tompkins has agreed to host two courses valued at over $2,500 each. Al is a legend in broadcast journalism and has taught all over the world.

The two courses he will teach are:

Producing for TV News

Writing/Storytelling for Video

Both courses are free for members, so sign up today!

If you have any questions, please contact:

Rich Dolan
[email protected]

For customer support if you need assistance with the Poynter website or after you are enrolled in one of these courses, please contact:

Maria Jaimes
Poynter Customer Experience Supervisor
[email protected]

The MVJ staff hustles hard to create these opportunities for our members, so we really hope that you’ll take full advantage of what we have to offer. And we’re not stopping here. In the coming weeks, we’ll have even bigger news to share with y’all (paid fellowships!). Keep checking in to make sure you don’t miss it!

Six Ways to Succeed on LinkedIn

By Resources

By David Bruce

A lot of people become jaded with LinkedIn when they first get started. They think because they opened a profile job offers will just start rolling in. But when has anything been that easy in life? With a little bit of effort and consistency LinkedIn can help you get a job, get freelance work, or put you in contact with an expert for your next article. Here is how to set yourself up for success on LinkedIn.

1.) Profile: You want people to get a sense of who you are when they look at your profile. You are allowed 120-characters to accomplish that. Do not use seeking opportunities in your headline. Recruiters are searching by job titles. If you are looking for writer jobs, use writer. Or be more specific and use, Adventure Writer or Travel Writer; use whatever is in your writing niche.

Have a picture. You know how alarm bells go off when people try to connect with you on social media and they don’t have a photo? The same alarm bells go off for recruiters when you don’t have a photo on your profile. The photo should be a straight on shot of your face, sans sunglasses and without your cat. Unless you’re writing about cats.

2.) Summary Section: Time to sell yourself. The Summary section is where you can define yourself in the first person, in 2000 characters. Opportunity is knocking here. Make the most out of this section.

Example: My dream has always been to chase adventure and write engaging articles about my experiences. It seems like an appropriate dream given my experience serving in the military and my BA in Journalism… You get my point. Tell them what you are passionate about and what you do, or want to do.

Most important on this list is to have a completed profile. LinkedIn will let you know when you are 100% complete. LinkedIn members are 40 times more likely to be contacted by a recruiter when their profile is complete. Only 50% of the 760 million members on LinkedIn have a completed profile.

3.) Display your work: Not long ago, a recruiter contacted me via LinkedIn and we set up a phone call to discuss an opportunity. The job wasn’t a good fit due to location, but it gave me an opportunity to find the holes in my LinkedIn game. I asked the recruiter if there is anything that I should be doing differently with my profile. She was hesitant at first, but then told me.

She said, your profile says ‘Writer’, but I had to search through your posts to find any of your writing; there was nothing in your ‘Featured’ section. She sounded almost frustrated. You have to understand, they are scanning a lot of profiles and if you don’t give it to them up front they will move on to a profile that does. I immediately moved my posted articles to the Featured Section and now my published work comes up as soon as someone opens my profile.

4.) Listen to podcasts and then connect: Whatever your niche is listen to podcasts to find experts in this area. I like to write about terrorism. I often listen to podcasts on my commute into work. When people go on podcasts they are often coming off the heels of something timely, like writing a book about a current situation. I listen to the podcast and then send a connection request to that person. I also send along a note saying, I heard your podcast today and found this point interesting, and then I thank them for connecting. This has been a good formula that has led to work. Sometimes later I’ll interview them or have them give me an expert quote for an article I am reading. What I don’t do is cold pitch them in an introductory message; no one likes that. I don’t sell myself to them or ask for anything. That happens somewhere else, typically their email inbox, after some time.

5.) Join LinkedIn Groups: LinkedIn has a group for whatever it is that you like to write about. People exchange ideas there and they also ask questions that you might be able to answer. Many times, in these groups people will reach out to you for internships and freelance opportunities. Don’t overlook the opportunities that these groups can provide you.

6.) Stay Active: LinkedIn is an interactive platform. You should post your original content, which is simple because they have a template for you to write articles in. You can also repost other articles with your own commentary. My recommendation is to stay away from political, or divisive posts. When people look at your profile they see what your comments and posts are, remember this is a career platform, not Facebook. We want to avoid anything that comes off as negative and could potentially turn off a recruiter or someone looking to do business with you.

I hear a lot of people that are critical of LinkedIn, particularly when it comes to getting employment on the platform. In reality, it’s like anything else, with a little bit of effort, strategy and consistency it is a great tool that can bring opportunities into your life.

A Freelancer’s Glossary

By Features, Resources

by Abby Hood, Guest Contributor

A

Anonymous source – Anonymous sources are only unknown to the public. Usually the writer and editor know who the source is and is able to check their identification and expertise or qualifications. In rare cases I have heard of sources only being known to the writer for security purposes. Regardless, this just means the publication doesn’t print their name.

Asset – This usually refers to a piece of graphic element for a story or post, like a logo, photo, illustration, etc. You will hear this in both marketing and in newsrooms.

B

Byline – This just means a story you’ve written and published. “I have bylines in….” This is because your name is printed alongside the story, sort of like a dateline. Sometimes your legal name and byline will be different, i.e. my name is Abigail Lee Hood but my byline is Abby Lee Hood because that’s what I go by. Make sure you communicate this to editors.

Beat – A beat is your niche or expertise. Maybe you work the police beat, or the environmental beat. This is your speciality. But it’s also okay not to have one!

Breaking news story – This is a class, hard news story with no opinion or editorializing. Usually published very quickly after an event to get the news out.

C

Copy – The most vague term; this is literally just words. Could be words in a blog post, for a Facebook ad, or for a story. “Turn that copy in by Friday,” is a good example. They want the assignment, whatever it is, before the weekend.

Content – Another vague term; content is usually a marketing or social media term. Content is anything you post online, whether it’s video, email, blog post, etc. Usually you will create content for a client or company. It’s not as common in the journo industry.

Cold email –  A cold email is usually written to ask for business or try to get work. It’s different from a story pitch, which is usually only for the news industry. Cold emails are usually sent to try and get social media work or copywriting work and should introduce yourself and your qualifications to the potential client.

Cutline – The caption to a photograph or other illustration. Used interchangeably with “photo credit.”

Content creator – Someone who makes content online! This could be an Instagram influencer, YouTuber, etc.

Creative – This is usually a marketing or copywriting term and can be used interchangeably with “asset.” This is simply an illustration or piece of graphic design to accompany your copy. You might hear, “What creative are we getting with this?” or “When can we talk about creative for that post?”

D

Dateline – The bit of text at the beginning of a story that gives you the location, and sometimes the date, of where and when a story was written or reported.

Dek – This is a marketing term and usually refers to a dek of slides, aka a fancy name for a Powerpoint. Usually a dek pitches an idea, product, timeline, etc.

E

Edits –  Edits are changes and requested improvements, or feedback, on your piece. Your editor may say, “I’ll have those edits to you tomorrow.” You need to make the edits yourself; your editor will not do them for you.

Editorializing – This is inserting your opinion, voice or ideas into a story instead of doing straight, hard news. This is acceptable in some features and opinion pieces; make sure you know the publication you’re writing for so you understand what’s allowed and what’s not.

F

Feature story – A feature story is usually in the ballpark of 1,500 words and has an angle and a takeaway. It’s a deeper look at a trend, problem, new idea or sometimes, a person or company. This is usually not breaking news and will be published days or weeks after an event. It doesn’t always have to be connected to breaking news, though, and can be original reporting on something you’ve discovered to be newsworthy on your own.

Freelancer – A general term for someone who does any kind of work without a company or boss. Social media managers, journalists, copywriters, designers and other creatives can all fall under this category.

G

Graf – Short for paragraph.

I

Intro – There are many kinds of intros but I’m talking specifically here about a kind of email, one that usually introduces two people to each other. “Can I get an intro to Beth?” is a way to request a digital introduction to the person.

L

Lede – Journalist lingo for the opening graf of your story. Not spelled “lead” although you may see that from time.

N

Nut graf – The takeaway or thesis of your story. Usually comes one or two grafs after the lede. Tells the reader what you’ll be talking about for the rest of the story.

News peg – Used interchangeably with “news hook.” This is a news item or story the rest of your article hooks on to make it timely and relevant. You must have a news hook in most feature stories, although not always.

News hook – See above.

Newsworthiness – This is the qualification for being reported, best answered by asking, “Why is this worth writing and publishing?” This is the justification for telling readers a story. Something has newsworthiness if it’s important or timely.

O

Opinion story – An article that expresses opinion. These will often feature data, sources and interviews just like a news story—at least, the good ones do.

Op-ed – Used interchangeably with “opinion story.” See above. Short for “opinion editorial.”

P

Portfolio – A collection of your published work, normally used to show employers or editors you pitch. These can be digital or physical, and are important for designers, writers, marketers, etc.

Pitch – A news term. Send pitches to editors to get stories, usually via email.

Photo credit – Used interchangeably with “cutline.” See above.

Peg – Used interchangeably with “news hook.” You may hear an editor ask, “what’s the news peg?” Aka, what makes this timely and newsworthy?

S

Section – A part of the paper or publication, like the business section or the lifestyle section.

Source – Someone you interview for a story, or sometimes, a paper or other document you’re using to support your article.

T

Timeliness – The quality of a news story depends on timeliness; if you publish a story long after an event happens it’s no longer timely.

V

Vertical – Used interchangeably with “section.” Editors will be in charge of certain verticals, like the science or politics vertical.

Support Abby Hood’s “Bitchin’ Pitchin'” on Patreon

New opportunities for members! Check out NBCUniversal’s internships

By Career Opportunities, News

As you start your journey into media and journalism, internships give you valuable insight and experience that you’ll unlikely find elsewhere.

That’s why Military Veterans in Journalism highly recommends applying for these exciting opportunities (listed below) from NBCUniversal. Sophomores with a 3.0 or higher pursuing an associate, bachelor or graduate degree in an accredited program for the duration of the internship are qualified to apply.

NBCUniversal’s Summer 2021 Virtual Internship Program offers positions (application links below) for a variety of interests and career goals, and prepares you for work at a top-tier media outlet.

“It’s crucial you fill out the Google Form here and apply quickly! Opportunities at top-tier organizations like NBCU can be difficult to come by, and I want to see our members succeed.” – Zack Baddorf, MVJ Executive Director

Submit your application as quickly as possible for top consideration, and no later than Jan. 29. We will flag your application with NBCU because they want to ensure they have a diverse group of participants.

If working at NBCU sounds appealing, or you just want to learn more about the work environment and corporate culture, you can also sign up for their upcoming virtual information session Tuesday January 19 – Here You can Be Authentic – where you will hear firsthand accounts of employees of varying levels and backgrounds providing insight into their own experience with the intersection of career and identity. Sign up at the link and be there Tuesday at 2 p.m. ET/11 a.m. PT.

Thanks and good luck! As always, reach out if you have questions.

Ad Sales Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
CNBC Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Content Distribution Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Corporate Functions Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Corporate Legal Internship – Summer 2021, Remote
Data Engineering Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Data Science Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Filmed Entertainment Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Late Night & The Tonight Show Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Media Tech Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
NBC News & MSNBC Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
NBC News Digital Technology Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
NBC 5 Telemundo Chicago Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Operations & Technology Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Owned Stations & Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Owned Stations Digital Design Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Peacock Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
Stamford Media Center Digital Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
TV Ent. Digital / Graphic Design Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
TV Ent. Marketing / Communications Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
TV Entertainment Production / Dev Internships – Summer 2021, Remote
TV Ent. Research Internship – Summer 2021, Remote
Universal Studios Group Internships – Summer 2021, Remote